Lighting Up the Night

Darkroom Records releases its fifth compilation album

Anders+Harms+performs++with+his+band%2C+the+Sweaters.+%28Kaylee+Faddis%29
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Lighting Up the Night

Anders Harms performs  with his band, the Sweaters. (Kaylee Faddis)

Anders Harms performs with his band, the Sweaters. (Kaylee Faddis)

Anders Harms performs with his band, the Sweaters. (Kaylee Faddis)

Anders Harms performs with his band, the Sweaters. (Kaylee Faddis)

Kaylee Faddis, Reporter

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The loud bass echoes in the crowded room. The audience cheers on the performers. The backdrop of the stage, designed with stars, represents what every performer hoped to be at Cafe Berlin that night.

Darkroom Records had its fifth album release at Cafe Berlin in downtown Columbia on April 26. Doors opened at 6 p.m., giving people time to get ready for the night of music ahead featuring students from three of Columbia’s high schools.

Anders Harms, Battle freshman, and his band The Sweaters performed at the event. Harms said, “We just love playing for people, and it makes us really happy to see other people happy about our music.”

Nicole Tinsley, senior, was one of many to attend the album release party. At these events, people get to see their peers in another setting outside of school. Tinsley mentioned, “You get to see them in a whole different way. At school, they are focused on school, but here, they can do what the love without the constraints that other students put on them.”

Artists performed a wide variety of music ranging in tempo and speed. Jordan Smith, the Battle Darkroom Coordinator, was happy with the turnout this year. “I think we have a better vibe tonight; we have a wider variety of people tonight than in years past. We have 16 songs on this album from 16 different performers, and 10 of them are playing tonight. We’re really proud of how they are doing,” Smith said.

The money collected from CD sales goes to the Columbia Public Schools (CPS) Darkroom Records Program. Smith pointed out that being a singer or artist is not limited to only CPS high school students, and encourages other students to participate. “We are open to middle school and elementary school students,” Smith said. “I’ve worked with students from Fulton, Ashland, Jefferson City, and Marshall. We want to be completely open door.”

With four locations, Darkroom Records is always looking for more student interns who can earn credits in trades of audio engineering, sound production, or entrepreneurship and management. The program is almost entirely student-run. If interested, talk to Jordan Smith.

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